Digital Trust & Security Guest Seminar - Professor Delaram Kahrobaei

Time: 13:00 - 14:30

Venue: Online

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Speaker: Professor Delaram Kahrobaei, Chair of Cyber Security, The University of York

Title: Interactions between Group Theory, Cyber Security, Artificial Intelligence, and Quantum Computation

This seminar is open to all and will be delivered online. Registrants will be forwarded a meeting ID on the morning of the Seminar. If you have any difficulties accessing the seminar on the day, please email digitalfutures@manchester.ac.uk

Abstract: In this talk, Professor Kahrobaei will explore how group theory is playing a crucial role in cyber security and quantum computation. At the same time, how computer science (for example, machine learning algorithms and computational complexity) could help group theorists so tackle their open problems, as such this could help with cryptanalysis of the proposed primitives.

Symmetry is present in all forms in the natural and biological structures as well as man-made environments. Computational symmetry applies group-theory to create algorithms that model and analyze symmetry in real data set. The use of symmetry groups in optimizing the formulation of signal processing and machine learning algorithms can greatly enhance the impact of these algorithms in many fields of science and engineering where highly complex symmetries exist.

At the same time, Machine Learning techniques could help with solving long standing group theoretic problems. For example, in the paper [J. Gryak, R. Haralick ), D. Kahrobaei, Solving the Conjugacy Decision Problem via Machine Learning, Experimental Mathematics, Taylor & Francis (2019)] the authors use machine learning techniques to solve the conjugacy decision problem in a variety of groups. Beyond their utilitarian worth, the developed methods provide the computational group theorist a new digital “sketchpad” with which one can explore the structure of groups and other algebraic objects, and perhaps yielding heretofore unknown mathematical relationships.