Digital Humanities

Digital Humanities at Manchester brings together experts from the humanities and computer science with computational partners from across the University. With one of the largest concentrations of humanities scholars in the UK, The University of Manchester is harnessing cutting-edge digital methodologies and tools to address new research challenges and support primary research using computational methods and tools, digital outputs, and digital dissemination.

Areas of strength include transforming physical heritage materials into digital versions for online storage, presentation, and analysis; representing data visually in graphs, plots, charts and maps and discovering and extracting knowledge from the patterns and trends found in large sets of text documents, and the social and cultural critique of the digital using humanities and social science theories and methodologies.

DH@Manchester

Digital technologies are transforming research in the humanities. With one of the largest concentrations of humanities scholars in the UK, The University of Manchester is harnessing cutting-edge digital methodologies and tools to address new research challenges. DH@Manchester brings together experts from the humanities and computer science with computational partners from across the University including IT Services, Research IT, the University of Manchester Library, the John Rylands Research Institute, Methods@Manchester, and Manchester University Press. 

Digital Humanities is transforming academic development and research outputs across the University. Some of the ways they accomplish this are: Developing digital projects, Providing digital training, Expanding academic networks and Increasing communications. They are growing cross-disciplinary research clusters in areas including: TEI-XML, Data visualisation, Text mining, Heritage digitisation and imaging and Geoinformatics.

Main Contacts:

Dr Guyda Armstrong

Guyda is the Academic lead for Digital Humanities & Senior Lecturer in Italian at The University of Manchester. With a specialisation in literary computing, she held a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Early Modern Italian and New Media at Brown University (2001-03), working on the Decameron Web and later contributing to Brown’s Virtual Humanities Lab. She has worked on a number of collaborative projects with the John Rylands Library and Mimas, including the British Academy-funded Manchester Digital Dante Project and award-winning SCARLET project with Mimas, using AR in Special Collections teaching. She is currently working on a number of digital projects centring on the technologies and information design of the premodern book, with partners including the School of Computer Science at Manchester and the Visual Geometry Group at the University of Oxford.

Sean Bechhofer

Sean is a Senior Lecturer in the Information Management Group within the University of Manchester School of Computer Science. His research interests are centered around the technologies required to implement and deliver the Semantic Web, such as such as OWL, SKOS and RDF. He has been a participant in W3C Working Groups developing Semantic Web languages, and was responsible for the development of editors and APIs to support the development and use of OWL ontologies and SKOS vocabularies. He has been involved with a number of European projects such as Wf4Ever and SCAPE.

 

Dr Jonathan Huck

Jonathan is a Lecturer in Geographical Information Science at the University, specialising in the geospatial software development. His research interests include the representation of vague geographical entities in GIS, new approaches to participatory mapping, and the application of new technologies to geographical data collection. Amongst other things, he maintains the freely available Map-Me platform for participatory mapping, which have been used by a variety of research, commercial and governmental institutions across the world.

 

 

 

Robert Haines

Robert works with academics and researchers to design, implement, modify and install maintainable, usable and well-tested software systems to enable them, and their collaborators, to do their research. This might mean creating new software, researching entirely new ways of doing things or identifying and possibly modifying existing applications. He has worked in a wide range of domains for research projects of various types and sizes from small "proof of concept" investigations up to long-term multi-partner RCUK, EU and US NSF projects. He has also collaborated with diverse organisations such as utility companies, national laboratories, start-ups and public bodies as well as other universities. He also contributes to a number of open-source software projects.

 

 

Dr Jackie Carter

Jackie Carter is Professor of Statistical Literacy, Co-director of the Manchester Q-Step Centre, and Director for Engagement with Research Methods Training at the University of Manchester. Jackie also works on the ESSTED (Enriching Social Science Teaching with Empirical Data) team, an ESRC funded project. A key aim is to embed quantitative data within topic based modules. This approach allows students to encounter, interpret and reflect on quantitative data within a subject-specific setting. In turn, these experiences can help students to engage with theory, learn about the research process and develop quantitative skills that are useful for more advanced methods courses and the workplace.